Can You Play Like a Grandmaster? Let’s See! Bobby Fischer’s Best Chess Games, Moves, Tactics, Ideas

Are You the Next Bobby Fischer? Let’s Find Out! In this video. we will look at some great games of Bobby Fischer & we will see what moves did he play in those positions. Let’s See if You Can Think Like a Grandmaster. You will learn some amazing chess tactics, strategies, ideas, tricks, traps & moves, that you can use to win more games against your friends & other players online. Games Covered include ones with Benko, Weinstein, Reshevsky, Reuben Fine & Barczay. I also have an interesting Chess Giveaway Puzzle organized by the Chess Universe Team. Let’s see if you can solve that.

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Also, Check out my previous chess videos:
Fajarowixz Gambit Traps:
Englund Gambit Tricks & Traps:
Evans’ Gambit Tricks & Traps:
Mortimer Trap:
Traxler Counter Attack #1:
Traxler Counter Attack #2:
24 Chess Tactics Explained:
Sicilian Defense Trap:
Fried Liver Attack: Secret Chess Opening TRICK to Win Fast:
Two Knights Defense Traps: Chess Opening Tricks to Win Fast:
Budapest Gambit Traps: Chess Opening TRICK to WIN Games Fast:
Halosar Trap: Chess Opening TRICK to WIN Games Fast:
Chess Opening Tricks & Traps in Queen’s Gambit Accepted:
Siberian Trap: Chess Opening TRICK to WIN Games Fast:
Stafford Gambit: Chess Opening TRICK to WIN Games Fast:
Fishing Pole Trap: Chess Opening TRICK to WIN Games Fast:
Legal’s Mate Trap: Secret Chess Opening TRICK to Win Fast:
How to Checkmate with 2 Bishops & a King:
Lasker Trap: Secret Chess Opening TRICK to Win Fast:
Blackburne Shilling Gambit: Secret Chess Opening Trick & Puzzle:
Poison Pawn Trap: Chess Opening Trick to Win Fast:
Tennison Gambit: 4 Secret Tricks to WIN FAST:
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147 Comments

  1. Queen to h6 then black move his queen to f8 then queen takes the black pawn on h7 then king take the queen on h7 then h5 takes the black pawn on g6 then king takes the white pawn on g6 last light squre bishop went to e4 checkmate

  2. Qh6 from white…
    What Qh6 does is now black king has no space to go… So he will probably resign… And if he dosent resign and plays something else then Qg7 is a checkmate

  3. Don't say cunning move, it was intelligent move.

  4. At 3:15 he could have moved soldier infront of king , sacrificing queen. He may lost after some time but their is a move

  5. Wow bobby fischer is very nice

  6. Puzzle. I think queen h6 will be the best move for white as it threatens a check mate and leaves no square for the black king to go

  7. So for the end puzzle, it is bishop to g7. If king takes, the queens takes pawn a game is over.

  8. Pawn to g6 he can't take the pawn because if he take there will be checkmate or will don't take then also there is a checkmate

  9. Black lady is gone – Chess Talks
    (BBC latest coverage)

  10. Even bishop takes rook after that the rook can capture the bishop it will end up being the same position of rook

  11. Giveaway Puzzle.

    1. Qh6
    2. Qf8 to stop mate.
    3. Oxh7 Queen Sacrifice
    4. King takes the queen is forced
    5. And hxg6+
    6. King takes the pawn as well.
    7. And finally Be4#.

    But,

    If,
    6. King goes back to g8, then
    7. Rh8#

  12. hxg6,fxg6,Qh6 whatever qeen has two places to checkmate

  13. white: Queen to h6.black:pawn to c1(promotion).White:Queen to g7 is a checkmate.

  14. Qh6 qf8 qxh7 kxh7 xg6 kxg6 be4 # a stunning mate

  15. H5 capture G6 when pawn on h7 takes back rook to h8 checkmate

  16. The first move can be knight also .. I THiNKED about that trapping the rook

  17. Fisher vs weinsten weinsten queen check

  18. Queen h6 if queen f8 queen f7 check king takes queen pawn takes on g6 check if king g8 then rook h8 is a checkmate. So king takes g6 then bishop e4 is a stunning checkmate. So after Pawn c1 promotes to a queen Then Queen to g7 is a checkmate….

  19. solution Qh6 Qf8 Qxh7+ Kxh7 hxg6+ Kxg6(Kg8 Rh8#) Be4#

  20. Greatest GMs
    1. Carlsen
    2. Kasparov
    3. Fischer
    4. Vishwanathan Anand

  21. 1:31 i got this one right but the thing is that I didnt know why did I sacrificed it….

  22. queen to h6 then , queen to h7 check , if king takes then pawn to g6 double check if he takes the pawn then bishop to e4 is a checkmate if isn't then rook h8 is a checkmate

  23. In the Fischer-Barczay, 1967 match, what if black plays Re6 after white's Ng5?

  24. Queen to h6 because it is a forced checkmate at g7 square and ther is no way to stop it

  25. white to move. pawn takes on g6. black recaptures. queen to h6 threatening a checkmate. black can move his king to f8 but queen to h8 is still a checkmate because of the bishop guarding the e7 square.

  26. This puzzle may be a best way to improve how to sacrifice our pieces to gain advantage or even win.
    Solution:it starts with Qh6,now black promotes to queen, we will take it and if the Rxc1 happens ,we will simply move our king,but the Qg7# threat doesn't stop.After that black plays Qf8 protecting the threat ,but the brutal move decides the game,Qxh7,it is the powerful move.After Kxh7,Pawn
    takes pawn or hxg6,double check After Kxg6,Be4+ is a stunning checkmate.

  27. Qxg6+
    If Kf8 Qg7#
    so hxg6 hxg6
    And After any move black play Rh8#

  28. Qh6 Qf8 Qxh7+ Kxh7 hxg6 hxg6 and is stunning Be4#

  29. How Many of these Positions could You Solve on Your Own? Let me know in the Comments….

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